Cross-curricular learning (including Curriculum policies)

New Life Christian Academy

 

Curriculum Document

Introduction

This document is a guide to the aims and structure of our curriculum at New Life Christian Academy.  It outlines policies on all subjects as well as details of the Programmes of Study (and scheduling) for the Supplementary Curriculum Plan (based on the National Curriculum)

Programmes of Study and progression schedule for subjects covered by the Accelerated Christian Education package are available from the ACE Scope and Sequence and Procedures Manual. Full schemes of work for the Supplementary Curriculum programme are available from the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) or are downloadable online at:

http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/schemes3/

 

New Life Christian Academy operates in 3 phases:

Phase 1  – Reception year to Year 5 (age 4-10)

Phase 2 – Year 6 to Year 9 (age 10 – 14)

Phase 3 – Year 10-13 (age 14-18)

Outlines of provision and expectations for the phases can be found in Appendix 1

 

See Appendix 2 for Information on Subject Coverage and Appendix 3 for additional information

Section 1

Subject Policy Statements

Subject

Pages

 “Learning to Read” Programme and Integration into Infant class

3

Language and Literature

4 – 5

Teaching English as a second language

6

Maths

7 – 8

Science

9 – 11

History

12 – 13

Citizenship

14

Geography

15 – 16

Art and Design

17 – 18

Design Technology

19

Information Technology

20

Music

21

Physical Education

22

Religious Education

23 – 24

Personal, Social and Health Education

25

Modern Foreign Language

26

 


Policy Statement

 

 “Learning to Read” Programme and Integration into Phase 1

 

Our desire is that right from those first experiences the child is beginning to gain a perception of

 

a)    Their  unique value and contribution as a child of God

 

b)    The unique value and contribution of each person they meet

 

We aim to build up gradually the time the child is apart from their parent, and to blend home and school experiences into a cohesive whole, in terms of the world-view a child receives, the moral and spiritual values they are taught, and the disciplining they experience.

 

Reception Year:  Will follow the “Learning to Read” programme provided by ACE “School of Tomorrow” which will be accompanied by a full programme of activities based on Early Years Learning  Goals that link to the topic covered in the Phase 1 Supplementary Curriculum and other areas as are relevant.  The school follows statutory guidance on Early years and profiles are completed for each child with moderation by the Local Authority.

 

Through the “Learning to Read” Programme students develop phonetic skills and a raft of sight words to enable them to learn to read for themselves.  It is a concentrated programme that combines oral, visual, aural and motor – co-ordination skills to develop knowledge of letter sounds and blends to make words and sentences.  It also continues to build on character development.  Once the programme is successfully complete d the students start on the individualised PACE programme and take increasing control of their own learning within the Phase 1 Learning Centre.

 

Those who are not ready to follow the “Learning to Read” programme will take part in a differentiated “Reading Readiness” programme during the morning activities and will join the Phase 1 programme for the afternoons.  When deemed ready they will then join the “Learning to Read” programme.

 

An outline of provision can be found in  Appendix 2

Other relevant documentation:

Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage
Policy statement                                

 

Language and Literature

 

Aims

 

God is a God of words.  He gave His Word – the Bible.  He spoke the universe and the earth into being.  He gave us the Ten Commandments.  Jesus Christ is Word of God and His words give life to us.  Man is made in God’s image and this can be seen in His speech and writing.

God gave us words in order that man might:-

 

  1. be distinct from every other part of creation

 

  1. have the tools to formulate thoughts, ideas, feelings, beliefs.

 

  1. have the ability to communicate with one another.  As students understand how language works by looking at its patterns, structures and origins, they can choose and adapt what they say and write in different situations.

 

Therefore our speech and language are of the greatest importance.

 

Objectives

 

At an appropriate stage students will learn

 

  • To speak well – clearly, accurately and appropriately in a variety of contexts, for a variety of purposes, and to a variety of audiences.
  • To listen carefully and with understanding, and respond appropriately.
  • To read with comprehension and speed, on their own and to a variety of audiences, adult and student.  They will learn to read from a range of materials, reflecting on, analysing and discussing where appropriate.
  • To write accurately and neatly, using rules and conventions of written English to express meaning in different ways, planning, writing for a range of purposes and audiences, and drafting and editing their work as necessary.
  • To make use of word processing facilities to present work and to draft and re-draft a piece of written work

 

Staff will correct wrong spelling, inaccurate speech patterns and careless writing wherever they occur in all subjects.

American words will be replaced by English spellings (in Word Building PACEs especially) so that students distinguish between different spellings (e.g. labor/labour). Students will be taught to understand the meanings of words in their cultural context (e.g. sidewalk/pavement).

 

 

 

 

Policy statement                                

 

Language and Literature continued…

 

 

Strategies for Developing Speaking, Listening and Literacy (Reading and Writing)

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence, Supplementary Curriculum Plan, overviews of Phase provision/expectations and additional information (Reading)

 

The Supplementary Curriculum will also provide opportunities to develop and apply reading and writing skills through:

 

Reading

  • Silent reading – Concentrating on enjoyment of imaginative worlds, developing knowledge of factual information, interesting story lines and creative use of language to develop a love of reading
  • Reading aloud of personal writing, Bible passages, chosen extracts from books for Oral Reports, of reading books and discussion of the book.  This will include the use of reading with expression and dramatising texts.
  • Readmaster - IT Programme to develop reading speed and comprehension.

Writing

  • Use written language to communicate to others and express themselves.
  • Write in a wide range of genres, cross curricular, for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  • Develop skills of planning, drafting, revising and presentation.

Speaking/Listening

  • to encourage awareness of others, to speak clearly and with sense in order to be understood; to be an attentive and responsive audience.
  • Prepare and give oral reports on a regular basis
  • Drama/role play/ performances and analysis of these
  • Listening to texts being read aloud
  • involvement in presentations, Assemblies, discussions, circle times, talk strategies, memorising scripture

 

Policy Statement

 

Teaching English as a second language

 

The policy of New Life Christian Academy is to treat each student as an individual and work out a programme to meet his/her needs.  This same principle will apply to any student learning English as a second language.  Our first task is to determine the present level of competence, and then provide a programme that will help to develop the student’s language proficiency.  We need to take into consideration the student’s age, cultural background, previous experiences and future requirements before devising a programme.  A key will be to encourage the student to talk/write in a relaxed environment one to one.  We will liaise with parents to use past experiences to help build relationships and point of contact with the students.

 

Since research shows clearly that students learn a second language most easily in an environment that is stress-free, we work continually with the present student body to develop an awareness of different countries and cultures, and the intrinsic value of all people as creations of a loving God.  We trust that this means that when students from other countries or cultures join the school they are greeted with warmth and acceptance, and that conversation grows naturally amongst peers.

 

The English ACE language programme is clearly structured and builds grammatically, so its structure is helpful for students needing to learn a second language.  Because the students’ personal work programmes are individualised it is easier to establish students of a similar age in different PACE levels without that difference carrying a stigma of failure or inability.  Guidance will also be given to identify American words and their English equivalent to ensure a more thorough understanding.

 

Staff will monitor carefully the progress of a student learning English as a second language, following an action plan with targets, deadlines, and reviews.

 

Resources:

 

-           Use of main ACE programme English PACEs from 1001, and Word Building from 1013

 

-           Option: Videophonics course (design for ESL – English as a second language – students)


Policy Statement                                     

 

Maths

 

Aims

 

In the world that God made we see Maths – number, pattern, structure, design, balance.  A study of Maths enables a student to see more clearly the Creator God at work in His world.  Mathematics equips man (who is the pinnacle of God’s creation) with a uniquely powerful set of tools to understand and change the world in accordance with God’s purpose.

 

These tools include logical reasoning, problem-solving skills, and the ability to think in abstract ways.  Mathematics is important in everyday life, many forms of employment, science and technology, medicine, the economy, the environment and its development, and in public decision-making.

 

Different cultures have contributed to the development and application of mathematics.  Today, the subject transcends cultural boundaries and its importance is universally recognised.  Mathematics is a creative discipline.  It can stimulate moments of pleasure and wonder when a pupil solves a problem for the first time, discover a more elegant solution to that problem, or suddenly sees hidden connections.

 

Objectives

 

At an appropriate stage students will learn

  • To write numbers accurately, understand place value, make estimates and approximates: they should be able to measure length, weight, volume and time.
  • As well as being able to count and to learn times-tables and perform mental arithmetic, at an appropriate age they should know how to use a calculator; they should develop a number-sense.
  • To use the four rules of arithmetic on whole numbers, fractions and decimals without the use of a calculator (up to PACE 1084)
  • To understand and use Fractions, decimals, percentage
  • Standard formulae for perimeter, area and volume of  2-D and 3-D shapes as well as standard definitions for these objects like radius, π
  • Estimating and measuring angles and angle properties for the triangle and other polygons using simple formulae
  • Algebra  - up to forming and solving equations, solutions by graph
  • To be able to follow a line of research, write a report, conduct investigations independently or in a group and present findings
  • To be able to apply mathematics to everyday-life i.e. be numerate, including cooking and recipes, shopping (including giving change); basic principles of budgeting, saving, giving, house purchase, estimating costs and times for journeys et, finding routes from place to place
  • To be able to apply mathematics in simple scientific situations
  • To grasp differential and integral calculus
  • Ratio, Proportion, Probability and statistics

Policy Statement                                     

 

Maths continued…

 

 

  • Trigonometry, basic functions and formulae
    • To Handle data, including the use of ICT
    • Units of measure – distance, time, capacity and weight

 

 

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence, Supplementary Curriculum Plan, overviews of Phase provision/expectations and additional information (Times tables/Counting)

 

The Supplementary Curriculum will ensure that students will have an appreciation of number and skill, across the curriculum, in using appropriate levels of accuracy in estimating and calculating sensible answers to scientific, theoretical and practical situations. They will achieve this by having opportunities to explore all aspects of maths practically and working by hand and calculator including mental arithmetic, as well as talking about mathematical problems.  They will work on applying maths to practical situations and to investigating and solving real life problems and puzzles.

 

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

Science

 

Aims

 

God is the Creator – Sustainer of all things (all physical properties of our planet, all organic and inanimate matter on it, the wider universe, and time itself).  We learn more about Him through our study of the universe He has made.

 

‘…since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made…’

Romans 1:20

 

God has given man responsibility to govern the earth.  He must know how it works in order to care for it responsibly.  A study of science stimulates and excites pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them.  It also satisfies this curiosity with knowledge. Because science links direct practical experience with ideas, it can engage learners at many levels.  Scientific method is about developing and evaluating explanations through experimental evidence and modelling.  This is a spur to critical and creative thought.  Through science, pupils understand how major scientific ideas contribute to technological change – impacting on industry, business and medicine, and improving quality of life.  Pupils recognise the cultural significance of science and trace its worldwide development.  They learn to question and discuss science-based issues that may affect their own lives, the direction of society and the future of the world.

 

Objectives

 

Students will develop Scientific Inquiry Skills:-

 

  • Ideas and Evidence in Science
  • Investigative Skills (planning, obtaining and presenting evidence, considering evidence and evaluating)

 

Through study of the following areas:-

 

  1. Life processes and living things
  2. Materials and their properties
  3. Physical processes

 

Students will be taught to:-

 

  1. Communicate effectively, using appropriate scientific terminology to explain the behaviour of living things, materials, phenomena and processes.
  2. Understand, respect and care for the environment of their own community and the world at large, thus fulfilling God’s mandate to be good stewards of the world.

Policy Statement                                     

 

Science continued…

 

 

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence and Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum will ensure that students will have the opportunity to develop:

  • Scientific enquiry:

-The importance of collecting evidence by making observations and measurements when trying to answer a question

-Science is about thinking creatively to try to explain how living and non living things work and cause/effect

  • Investigative skills:

Planning

- ask questions and decide how they might find answers to them

- use first-hand experience and simple information sources to answer

questions

- think about what might happen before deciding what to do

- recognise when a test or comparison is unfair

Obtaining and presenting evidence

- follow instructions and use equipment appropriately to control the risks to themselves and to others

- explore, using the senses of sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste as appropriate, and make and record  observations and measurements

-check observations by repeating them

- communicate what happened in a variety of ways, including using ICT

Considering evidence and evaluating

-make comparisons and identify simple patterns or associations

-drawing conclusions

-compare what happened with what they expected would happen, and try to explain it, drawing on their knowledge and understanding

- review their work and explain what they did to others.

Taken from “Scientific Enquiry” Section of the National Curriculum

 

This will be done through a range of practical activities that relate to work from PACEs and QCA units/topic work including a wide Breadth of Study.

Pupils will be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through:

-a range of domestic and environmental contexts that are familiar
and of interest to them

-looking at the part science has played in the development of many
useful things

-using a range of sources of information and data, including ICT

based sources

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

Science continued…

 

-using first-hand and secondary data to carry out a range of scientific
investigations, including complete investigations.

Communication through:

-use of scientific language to communicate ideas and to name and
describe living things, materials, phenomena and processes

Health and safety through:

-recognising that there are hazards in living things, materials and physical
processes, and assess risks and take action to reduce risks to
themselves and others.

Taken from “Breadth of Study” Section of the National Curriculum

 

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

History

 

Aims

 

History is about understanding who we are, where we’ve come from, and what has happened along the way.  The Bible is the history of God’s relationship with man from the point of creation.

 

As they study history, students will:

 

  1. Develop a chronological frame work for their knowledge of significant events and people
  2. See what people, societies and cultures were like in the past, and how they differed from ours today
  3.    Consider how the past influences the present
    1. Understand more about themselves as individuals and members of society
    2. Discover that what they learn can influence their decisions about personal choices, attitudes and values

 

Objectives

 

Students will:-

 

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past, in a range of social, cultural, political and religious contexts
  • Develop skills of historical enquiry:-

 

-          identifying, selecting and using appropriate sources of information

-          evaluating these sources: relative values of first sources/reported information, etc

-          recognising and evaluating different interpretations of history

 

  • Learn how to collate and present historical information, using a range of techniques including spoken language, written reports and use of ICT, with supporting argument and explanation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

History continued…

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence and Supplementary Curriculum Plan

 

The Supplementary Curriculum taught through QCA schemes of work will give opportunity for pupils to develop:

-          Chronological understanding to enable students to place objects, events and people in time

-          Knowledge and Understanding of events, people and changes in the past

-          An understanding of how people, societies and cultures have been influenced and developed by events and over time

-          Historical Representation and Interpretation

-          Skills in how to find out about the past from a range of sources through historical enquiry

-          Abilities to communicate and organise information effectively

 

Knowledge, skills and understanding will be developed through studying local history, British history, Recent history and European/World history and different cultures through time.

 

 

 

 

Policy Statement                               

 

Citizenship

 

We are all citizens, in the sense that we live in community – a series of communities, in fact, from the family through the neighbourhood and nation to the world.  God requires us to be committed, contributing members of those communities, and our aim is to prepare our young people to fulfil this role as they grow into adulthood.

 

We desire our students to understand and accept the responsibility that comes with being part of a community; to learn to identify the role and recognise the importance of legal, political, religious, social and economic institutions and systems that influence their lives and communities; to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law; and to learn how to use what God has given them in the service of others.

 

By developing the skills of enquiry, communication and responsible participation, students will learn about:

  • Legal/human rights and responsibilities; the criminal justice system/civil law
  • The diversity of cultural and ethnic groups in our nations; the need for understanding and respect
  • Central and Local Government; services provided
  • Parliament, workings of, and the electoral system, including politics
  • The economy: role of business services
  • Our place in Europe
  • Media
  • Employment
  • Global issues, economic, environmental, etc
  • Simple aspects of money management eg Banking etc

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum gives the opportunity for students to see things from others’ point of view, as they think about and discuss topical political, spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues, problems and events.  They will acquire knowledge and understanding to allow them to become informed citizens, develop skills of enquiry and communication and prepare them to play an active role as a citizen through QCA schemes of work.

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

Geography

 

Aims

 

Our aim is for our students to come to realise that the world we live in is a gift from its Creator to us, its inhabitants, to enjoy and to care for.  In order to achieve these objectives, students will learn more of the world, its features, its people and their ways, so as to better appreciate the value of the gift and the nature of our responsibility.

 

As students study geography, they will acquire knowledge of places and environments, locally and throughout the UK and the world, and develop a range of investigative and problem-solving skills both inside and outside the classroom (all good preparation for adult life and employment).

 

In their studies they will encounter different societies and cultures, and investigate issues relating to the local, regional and global environment and sustainable development.  This will expand their horizons and help them to think about their own place in the world – their values, and their responsibilities to the world God created and has placed them in.

 

Objectives

 

Geographical enquiry and skills

 

Students will learn to:-

 

  • Use geographical vocabulary, and ask geographical questions, e.g. ‘How/why has this landscape changed?’
  • Collect and record evidence (e.g. use of land in the local area, statistics about countries)
  • Analyse and evaluate evidence
  • Appreciate other people’s values and culture
  • Develop growing proficiency in the use of atlases, maps, globes and plans
  • Select and use secondary sources of evidence, e.g. photographs, reference books, IT sources (Internet)

 

Knowledge and Understanding of Places

 

Students will learn:-

 

  • Of their role as custodians of the environment and more generally of the planet
  • To locate places and environments, nationally and internationally, on the world map
  • To understand something of the physical and human features that distinguish parts of the world from each other
  • To explain how and why changes happen in places; how places are interdependent; leading to concept of global citizenship

 

Policy Statement

 

Geography continued…

Knowledge and Understanding Patterns and Processes

 

Students will learn to:-

 

  • Recognise and comprehend patterns of physical and human features and relate them to the character of places and environments
  • Identify and explain physical and human processes and their impact on places and environments (e.g. agriculture, soil-erosion, etc)

 

Knowledge and Understanding of Environmental Change and Sustainable Development

 

Students will learn to:-

 

  • Describe and explain environmental change and recognise ways of managing it (e.g. deforestation)
  • Explore the idea of sustainable development and its implications for people, places and environments

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence Years 1-7 and Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum taught through QCA schemes of work will give opportunity for pupils to develop:

-                    Geographical skills and enquiry: ask questions, observe and record, analyse evidence, express own views, communicate, use geographical vocabulary, fieldwork, use globes, maps and plans, secondary sources, make decisions

-                    Knowledge and Understanding of places: know and describe places, explain and compare places and how they are  linked, know and explain changes

-                    Knowledge and Understanding of patterns and processes: human and physical features/processes

-                    Knowledge and Understanding of environmental changes and sustainable development: improve/sustain environment, recognise changes in environment, how decisions effect people’s lives, management of environment and their own involvement.

Knowledge, skills and understanding will be developed through studying localities (in the UK and abroad), water, settlements and environmental issues, studying at a range of scales, places and carry out fieldwork.

 

Policy Statement                                                 

 

Art & Design

 

Aims

 

Design and colour surround us in the world God made.  In all its variety and intricacy nature reflects the magnificent ingenuity of the creator God.  Man, made in God’s image, has the potential to appreciate and imitate that creativity.  He sees and understands his world, and uses the patterns, colours, forms, textures, materials and processes around him to interpret and reproduce what he sees and feels, and to create his own patterns and structures within his world.  Man uses art and design both as a practical tool and as an aesthetic experience.

 

Art and design reflects cultures and periods in history, and helps us to understand one another without the barrier of words.  It enables us to express thoughts and emotions that might otherwise lie buried.

 

Through the teaching of art and design pupils develop their understanding of the creative structure of the world around them, and experience, interpret, and develop their own ideas.  They communicate what they see, feel and think.  They learn to make aesthetic and practical judgements and decisions.  They learn about the diverse roles and functions of art, craft and design in contemporary life and in different times and cultures.  They gain an understanding of how art and design can enrich or personal and public lives and environment.

 

Objectives

 

Students will develop the ability to:-

 

  • Enjoy art and design for its own sake
  • Develop personal skills and abilities, including a strong sense of creativity and self expression in order to demonstrate and build on our individuality and the gift of creativity given by God
  • Work together and appreciate each other’s contribution
  • Develop the ability to express thoughts and feelings in visual form
  • Experience art and design from different cultures and historical periods
  • Learn about the work of individual artists
  • Evaluate art and design aesthetically and intellectually
  • Apply artistic and design skills to the practical word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Statement                                                 

 

Art & Design continued…

 

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum gives the opportunity for students to express ideas, thoughts and feelings in another dimension. Students will develop their own abilities and skills by having experience of a range of media and stimulus.  As well as specific skills being taught through QCA schemes of work, work will link, where possible, to topic work in other subject areas.

 

Skills and material use to be developed: -

IT Design

Colour -  Drawing – pastels, pencils, charcoal, crayon

-       sketchbook use

Texture – Painting – watercolour, poster paints, oils

Pattern

Collage

3D Design

Textiles

 

Policy Statement                                     

 

Design Technology

 

Aims

 

A study of Design Technology enables students to take their place as stewards of the world God created and entrusted to them.  They learn to think and intervene creatively to improve quality of life.  The subject calls for pupils to become creative problem solvers, as individuals and members of a team.  They must look for needs, wants and opportunities and respond to them by developing a range of ideas and making products and systems.  They combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social and environmental issues, function and industrial practices.  As they do so, they reflect on and evaluate present and past design and technology, all pupils can become discriminating and informed users of products; they can also become innovators.

 

Objectives

 

Students will develop the ability to:-

 

  • Analyse a problem
  • Research and plan solutions to the problems
  • Implement plans
  • Evaluate outcomes

 

Students will develop these skills through a series of projects and assignments which will include solving a range of problems using a variety of materials.

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum gives the opportunity for students to develop, plan and communicate ideas, work with and develop an understanding of a range of tools, equipment, materials and components, evaluate processes and products and follow safe procedures.  As well as being taught specific skills using QCA Schemes of work, focussed practical tasks will link, where possible, to topic work in other subject areas.

 

Skills in using a range of materials are to be developed which include:

-       Electrical components

-       Mechanical components

-       Food

-       Mouldable materials

-       Stiff and Flexible sheet materials

-       Textiles

 

 

Policy Statement                               

 

Information Technology

 

Aims

 

God, as the Creator, is the source of all ingenuity in our rapidly changing world.  Information and communication technology prepares pupils to participate in that world – other activities are increasingly transformed by access to varied and developing technology.  Pupils use ICT tools to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information responsibly, creatively and with discrimination.  They learn how to employ ICT to enable rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures.  We recognise that ICT has an important contribution to make to the school’s overall aim of developing the student’s capacity to learn independently.  With right guidance and support students will be able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to best effect, and to consider its implications, positive and negative, for home and work both now and in the future.  This will include the safe use of the Internet and Data Protection.

 

Objectives

 

Students will leave school familiar with and competent in:-

 

  • Keyboard skills
  • Word processing
  • Databases and Spreadsheets
  • Use of Internet, CD Roms

 

Strategy

 

  • Cross curricular use of ICT skills in all appropriate subject areas – History, Geography, Science, Art, Design Technology, Music, Language, Maths etc.
  • Typemaster
  • Readmaster/Mathbuilder/Wordbuilder

 

and details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum plan gives the opportunity for students to become increasingly independent and competent users of ICT tools and information sources (PCs, software, the internet) as well as other types of digital media technology; to explore ways in which ICT can be useful in a range of subjects and applications – as well as its limitations.  Students will increase knowledge, skills and understanding, develop ideas and make things happen, exchange and share information and review, modify and evaluate work through use of ICT in topic work and teaching of specific skills using QCA schemes of work.

 

Policy Statement                                                 

 

Music

 

Aims

 

Music has been part of man’s experience since the beginning of time.  It is intrinsic to the universe that God has made.  Music has the potential to lift man out of his own sense experience onto another plane – a place of worship and appreciation of something greater than himself.  The Bible shows heaven as full of music.

 

It is a significant tool in our experience of and communication about God and one another.  Through the teaching of music, pupils understand and develop their own intellect and emotions and forge links between themselves and a wider world.  They develop an ability to listen, appreciate, and make critical assessments.  They learn to work with others, and increase their own self-discipline and creativity.

 

Objectives

 

Students will develop the ability to:-

 

  • Enjoy music
  • Be active in participation – singing, performing, composing, listening
  • Read music and understand the elements of the music language
  • Use aural skills
  • Learn from each other in group music making
  • Evaluate music intellectually and aesthetically
  • Experience music from many traditions and cultures
  • Use musical technology when appropriate

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in the Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum, taught through QCA schemes of work, gives the opportunity for students to:

-Explore music

-Develop the ability to sing in tune, in unison and developing into parts, individually, with small and large groups, with reference to and some understanding of pitch, tone, duration and dynamics.

-Analyse and compare sounds

-Find out about different styles of music, composers and music from different cultures

-explore the origins of music and it’s change over time and how music is produced

-Perform music to an audience – singing and instrumental.

-Work together to celebrate a seasonal festival/special event -recognising and using each other’s strengths to make a unified presentation

 

Music will also be an integral part of assembly times.

 

Policy Statement                                                 

 

Physical Education

 

Aims

 

God has designed man as a whole person, and the healthy functioning of our physical bodies informs all aspects of our lives.  Physical exercise activates the brain, increases energy levels and encourages enthusiasm for life.  Exercise during formative years enables our bodies to remain healthy and to function efficiently for the rest of our lives.

 

Objectives

 

Students will:-

 

  • Acquire and develop competence and confidence in specific physical skills
  • Select and apply those skills as they develop an understanding of tactics in individual or group activities
  • Work out and evaluate ways of improving their performance
  • Develop an understanding of the importance of health and fitness

 

Areas of activity include gymnastics, swimming, dance, athletics, team games, outdoors activities and adventure pursuits

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan

 

The Supplementary Curriculum Plan, taught through QCA schemes of work, gives the opportunity for students to:

-Acquire and develop skills

-Apply skills, tactics and compositional ideas for different activities and for individual, pair, small-group and team activities

-Evaluate and improve performance

-Develop knowledge and understanding of fitness and health

Physical Education will give students experience in:

-Dance Activities

-Games Activities

-Gymnastic Activities

and for Juniors additional:

-Swimming Activities

-Athletic Activities

-Outdoor and Adventurous Activities

 

 

Children will have access to 2 hours of PE per week on average.
Policy Statement                                           

 

Religious Education

 

Aims

 

The school is founded on the beliefs in:

  • The Bible (in its entirety) as the inspired Word of God, the infallible, all sufficient rule for faith and practice (2 Tim. 3:15-16; 2 Peter 1:21).
  • The fall of man, who was created pure and upright, but fell by voluntary transgression (Gen. 1:26-31, 3:1-7; Rom. 5:12-21).
  • God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit
  • Salvation through faith in Christ, who, according to the Scriptures, died for our sins, was buried and was raised from the dead on the third day, and that through His Blood we have Redemption (Titus 2:11, 3:5-7; Rom. 10:8-15; 1 Cor. 15:3-4). This experience is also known as the new birth, and is an instantaneous and complete operation of the Holy Spirit upon initial faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. (John 3:5-6; James 1:18; 1 Pet. 1:23; 1 John 5:1).
  • The operation of the gifts of the Holy Spirit and the gifts of Christ in the Church today (1 Cor. 12:4-11, 28; Eph. 4:7-16).
  • Holiness of life and conduct in obedience to the command of God (1 Pet. 1:14-16; Heb. 12:14; 1 Thess. 5:23; 1 John 2:6).
  • The bodily resurrection of all men, the everlasting conscious bliss of all who truly believe in our Lord Jesus Christ and the everlasting conscious punishment of all whose names are not written in the Book of Life (Dan. 12:2-3; John 5:28-29, 1 Cor. 15:22-24)

The belief in the supremacy of a loving and all-powerful God and His desire to relate to man informs and infuses every aspect of school life and work

 

Objectives

 

Our objectives are that:

 

  • Each student be encouraged to have their own personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ
  • They learn to allow their relationship with God to enable them to respect and care for both those immediately around them and ultimately all people
  • They grow in their relationship with God and in applying Godly values and principles to their life situations through their study of the Bible
  • Develop an knowledge and understanding of other major religions

 

 

Our faith is the foundation of the School and our concept of education, and students are encouraged to see the spiritual dimension as underlying and informing all areas of life and study.

 

 

Policy Statement                                           

 

Religious Education continued…

 

 

The PACE curriculum makes reference to spiritual and Biblical issues throughout, in all subjects, not just the specifically Bible-related courses (details of the latter can be found in the ‘PACE Scope and Sequence manual’)

 

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in ACE Scope and Sequence and Supplementary Curriculum Plan.

 

The Supplementary Curriculum, taught through QCA schemes of work, gives students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of Christian beliefs, practices and celebrations as well as other religions enabling students to develop respect for others and make informed choices.

 

In addition, within the school framework, there are specific opportunities for students to consider matters of a spiritual nature, and how their faith relates to the world around them.  These opportunities arise in the following ways:

 

  • Student Devotions – small groups, with a member of staff, discussing matters of personal faith and issues relevant to the age-group of the students
  • Morning assembly which involves worship, scripture reading and teaching

 

Policy Statement                               

 

Personal, Social and Health Education

 

At New Life Christian Academy PSHE is part of the ongoing life of the school where aspects of personal, social and health education arise in the course of study or discussion, through circle time discussions, assemblies or any general part of school life.  PSHE will be embedded in the life of the school and across the curriculum by being aware of, identifying and making use of every learning opportunity as it arises.  A strong sense of school community will allow and enable PSHE issues to be explored freely and in a caring, safe environment.

 

In addition PSHE is taught more formally through the use of the ‘Health for Life’ scheme (published by Nelson Thornes).

 

Broadly, our aims throughout this area of learning are:

 

  • To help students develop confidence in the character and gifting God has given them and through the security that knowing Him brings
  • To help them learn to take responsibility for themselves as individuals and to see how they can begin to make a responsible contribution to those around them and to society in general
  • To enable students to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle, physically, morally and spiritually, as they grow up
  • To provide a caring, safe and open environment for discussion
  • To enable them to acquire the understanding and wisdom needed to make decisions about life-skills – eg money, careers, citizenship  and relationships

(See appendix for Policy and Sex Education and relationships)

Policy statement                                

 

Modern Foreign Languages

 

Aims

 

God created a diverse world with people from many nations speaking in a variety of languages. By learning a foreign language it is our aim to enable to children to:

 

  • Develop linguistic competence
  • Extend knowledge of how language works
  • Explore similarities and differences between the foreign language and English
  • Raise awareness  of the multi-cultural, multi-lingual world we live in
  • Introduce an international dimension to learning
  • Give an insight into other cultures

 

Objectives

 

At an appropriate stage students will learn

 

  • Basic vocabulary
  • Conversational Phrases – Communicating with others
  • How to use and respond to the foreign language
  • How to listen carefully
  • Correct pronunciation and intonation
  • Techniques for memorising words, phrases
  • How to use context cues too interpret meaning
  • How to make use of English
  • To work with authentic materials
  • To consider experiences of others
  • Grammar
  • Writing
  • To use dictionaries and other reference material
  • Apply their language for real purposes

 

Strategy

 

Details laid out in Supplementary Curriculum Plan

 

Section 2

A.C.E. Scope and Sequence

 

Introduction

 

Accelerated Christian Education program is individualised.  It is designed to allow each student to work on their own level of achievement, which may vary from subject to subject.

 

The curriculum includes five major academic disciplines: Mathematics, English, Social studies, Science, and Word Building (traditionally called spelling).  Each PACE curriculum subject contains 144 PACEs beginning with Level 1 (PACE 1001) and ending with Level 12 (PACE 1144).  The exceptions to this are Maths (which contains 132 PACEs) and Word Building (which concludes at the end of the ninth level at PACE 1108).  Score Keys are used by the student in order to teach them to take responsibility for their own learning.

 

Each curriculum grade level course consists of 12 PACEs.  Videos are available for selected courses. Normally, a student will complete 65 to 75 PACEs in one academic year; however, this will vary according to the student’s ability and motivation.  Careful attention should be given by the school to ensure that each student keeps balance in the subjects in which he is working and that he is completing about the same number of PACEs in each subject.  A student who is more skilled may progress at a faster rate.  One who is slower is encouraged to do their best, but is able to work on their level of proficiency and proceed as they are able.  The typical student, then, is working on one PACE in each of five subjects.  The PACEs may be on varying levels according to their achievement in each subject according to the prescription after diagnostic testing.

See Scope and Sequence Manual on request from the school for list of PACEs.

Section 3

Supplementary Curriculum Plan

Phase 1 – 5 Year Rolling Programme

 

 

Year A

Autumn

Year B

Autumn

Year C

Autumn

Year D

Autumn

Year E

Autumn

 

Ourselves

WWII

Victorians

Ancient Egypt

The World and beyond

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work andOurselves QCA Unit 1AMoving and Growing

QCA Unit 4A

Practical science linked to PACE work andTeeth QCA Unit 3AHealth QCA Unit 5A

 

Practical Science linked to PACE work andGases QCA Unit 5DSound and Hearing QCA Unit 1F Practical Science linked to PACE work andRocks + Soils  QCA Unit 3DLight & Shadow QCA Unit 3F Practical Science linked to PACE work andEarth, Sun and Moon QCA Unit 5ESound  QCA Unit 5F

DT

Clay busts (Mouldable materials) Eat more fruit and veg QCA Unit 1CEnglish Food            (Food) Playgrounds QCA Unit 1B  (Mechanical components) Bread – QCA Unit 5B(Food) World Cookery (Based on QCA Units 3B/5D)(Food)

ICT

Text and graphics    QCA Unit 3AThe information around us QCA Unit 1COngoing word processing and digital media skills CommunicatingQCA Unit 3EOngoing word processing and digital media skills

 

Writing for different audiences QCA Unit 4ABranching Databases QCA Unit 4COngoing word processing and digital media skills An introduction to modelling QCA Unit 1ACreating pictures QCA Unit 2BOngoing word processing and digital media skills Analysing data and asking questions QCA Unit 5BEvaluating information QCA Unit 5COngoing word processing and digital media skills

History

How has life changed in Britain since 1948?QCA Unit 13Family tree What was it like for children in WWII?(Rationing) QCA Unit 9 What are we remembering on remembrance  day? QCA Unit 17
What was it like for children living in Victorian Britain?  QCA Unit 11

How did life change in our locality in Victorian times? QCA Unit 12

Ancient Egypt (based on QCA Unit 16) What are we remembering on remembrance  day? QCA Unit 17

Geography

Investigating our local  area – QCA Unit 6

Local traffic - QCA Unit 20  

Map skills

Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units5/18/24

A village in… (Based on QCA Unit 10) Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Link to EgyptOngoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Where in the world is Barnaby Bear? QCA Unit 5Weather around the world QCA Unit 7Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24

PE

 

Dance QCA Units 1/2/ 8/9/21Invasion Games QCA Units 10/11 Dance QCA Units 1/2/8/9/21Games QCA Units 3/4 Dance QCA Units 1/2/8/9/21Invasion Games QCA Units 10/11 Dance QCA Units 1/2/8/9/21Games QCA Units 3/4 Dance QCA Units 1/2/8/9/21Invasion Games QCA Units 10/11

Art

Portraying relationships – PortraitsQCA Unit 3A and 1A Still life Talking textiles QCA Unit 5C  Can we change places (Building structures)QCA Unit 3C Objects and meanings  – Still LifeQCA Unit 5A

Music

Animal Magic – Exploring descriptive sounds QCA Unit 9QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsChristmas rehearsal

Classical Music & Worship music

Class Orchestra QCA Unit 11

QCA Units 1/8 /15 – Ongoing skills

Christmas rehearsal

Classical Music & Worship Music

Cyclic patterns – rhythm and pulse QCA Unit 16QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsChristmas rehearsal

Classical music & Worship music

Feel the pulse – Exploring rhythm and pulse QCA Unit 4QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsChristmas rehearsal

Classical Music & Worship music

 

Journey into Space – Exploring sound sources QCA Unit 18QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsChristmas rehearsal

Classical Music & Worship music

RE

Belonging in Christianity QCA Unit 1BCelebrations – Harvest festival – Unit RA/Christmas – Unit 1C The Life of Jesus QCA Unit 3CCelebrations – Harvest festival – Unit RA/Christmas – Unit 1C  History of the Bible – QCA Unit 5CCelebrations – Harvest festival – Unit RA /Christmas – Unit 1C  Christian beliefs and practices QCA Unit 1DCelebrations – Harvest festival – Unit RA /Christmas – Unit 1C  Christianity, The Bible QCA Unit 3DCelebrations – Harvest festival – Unit RA /Christmas – Unit 1C 

Citizenship

Taking part QCA Unit 1 Living in a diverse world QCA Unit 5 Children’s rights, human rights QCA Unit 7 Taking part QCA Unit 1 In the media QCA Unit 11

MFL

French/Spanish – Basic vocabulary and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

Year A

Spring

Year B

Spring

Year C

Spring

Year D

Spring

Year E

Spring

 

Homes

The Environment

Water

Health

People in History

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work   – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical Science linked to PACE work andMaterials QCA Units 3C Gases QCA Unit 5C Practical Science linked to PACE work andHabitats QCA Unit 4BForces and movement QCA Unit 2E Practical Science linked to PACE workForces and motion QCA Unit 4E 4F Practical Science linked to PACE work andHealth and Growth QCA Unit 2APushes and pulls QCA Unit 1E Practical Science linked to PACE work andUsing Electricity QCA unit 2FMaterials QCA unit 4D

DT

Homes (Structures – stiff & flexible)QCA Unit 1D Money containers – Tudor purses (Textiles)QCA Unit 4A Musical Instruments QCA Unit 5A (Stiff & flexible materials) Vehicles/Winding up QCA Units 2A/2C(Mechanical components) Joseph’s coat – QCA Unit 2D(Textiles)

ICT

Introduction to spreadsheets QCA Unit 5DOngoing word processing and digital media skills Developing images and repeated patternsQCA Unit 4BIntroduction to Databases  QCA Unit 3C

Ongoing word processing and digital media skills

Data logging – Monitoring conditions changes QCA Unit 5F

Manipulating sound QCA Unit 3B

Ongoing word processing and digital media skills

Graphical modellingQCA Unit 5AOngoing word processing and digital media skills Creating a word bank QCA Unit 1BRepresenting information graphically QCA Unit 1EOngoing word processing and digital media skills

History

What were our homes like a long time ago? QCA Unit 2 General historical skills General historical skills Why do we remember Florence Nightingale? QCA Unit 4
How do we know about the great fire of London? QCA Unit 5

Geography

Village SettlersQCA Unit 9Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Environment, RecyclingQCA Unit 8 and 12Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Rivers – QCA Unit 14Water Cycle – QCA Unit 11Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Map skillsOngoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 What’s in the news? QCA Unit 16Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24

PE

Gymnastics QCA Units 5/6/14/15/27Striking and Fielding QCA Unit 12/25 Gymnastics QCA Units 5/6/14/15/27Net/Wall Games QCA Units 13/26 Gymnastics QCA Units 5/6/14/15/27Striking and Fielding QCA Unit 12/25 Gymnastics QCA Units 5/614/15/27Net/Wall Games QCA Units 13/26 Swimming QCA Unit 16

Art

Can buildings speak? QCA Unit 2C Investigating PatternsQCA Unit 3B Viewpoints QCA Unit 4A Containers QCA Unit 5B (Paper mache/clay) Journeys QCA Unit 4C

Music

Dragon scales – pentatonic scales QCA Unit 12QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsMusic from other cultures & Worship music Play it again – Rhythmic patterns QCA Unit 10QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsMusic from other cultures & Worship music What’s the score? Exploring instruments and symbols QCA Unit 6QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsWater music & Worship music Rain, rain go away – Exploring tembre, tempo and dynamicsQCA Unit 7QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skills

Music from other cultures & Worship music

Roundabouts – Exploring rounds QCA Unit 17Music from other cultures & Worship music

RE

Hindu beliefs – QCA Unit 4ACelebrations – Easter Religious celebrations QCA Unit 3BJewish Celebrations QCA Units 2A/2CEaster Muslim beliefs – QCA Units 5A/BCelebrations – Easter How Jewish people express their beliefs in practice QCA Unit 1ECelebrations – Easter Biblical characters QCA Unit RB/C + other characters eg JosephCelebrations – Easter

Citizenship

People who help us QCA Unit 4 Local Democracy QCA Unit 10 Respect for property QCA Unit 9 Choices QCA Unit 2 Rules and Laws QCA Unit 8(include politics)

MFL

French/Spanish – Basic vocabulary and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

Year A

Summer

Year B

Summer

Year C

Summer

Year D

Summer

Year E

Summer

 

An island home

Tudors

Ancient Greece
Our Locality
Toys

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical Science linked to PACE work andGreen Plants QCA Unit 3BLight and Dark QCA Unit 1D Practical Science linked to PACE work andElectricity QCA Unit 3E Growing plants QCA Unit 1B

 

Practical Science linked to PACE work and Sorting and Using Materials QCA Unit 1CMaterials QCA Unit 4C Practical Science linked to PACE work andPlants in their environment QCA Unit 2BVariation QCA Unit 2C Practical Science linked to PACE work andGrouping and changing materials QCA Unit 2DLife Cycles QCA Unit 5B

DT

Moving pictures QCA Unit 1AStory books QCA Unit 3D(Mechanical components) Lighting it up QCA Unit 4E(Electrical components)
Greek Urns/Theatre masks –paper mache/mod roc (Mouldable materials)
Alarms QCA Unit 4D (Electrical components) Puppets QCA unit 2B(Textiles)

ICT

Simulations  QCA Unit 3DCollecting and Presenting information QCA Unit 4DOngoing word processing and digital media skills Labelling and classifying QCA Unit 1DQuestions and Answers QCA Unit 2EOngoing word processing and digital media skills Finding information QCA Unit 2CWriting stories; communicating information using text QCA Unit 2AOngoing word processing and digital media skills Modelling effects on screen QCA Unit 4ESequence of instructions (traffic lights)QCA Unit 5E

Ongoing word processing and digital media skills

Routes:Controlling a floor turtle QCA Unit 2DUnderstanding instructions and making things happen QCA unit 1FOngoing word processing and digital media skills

History

General historical skills Why did Henry VIII Marry six times?QCA Unit 7What were the differences between rich and poor in Tudor times?  QCA Unit 8 Who were the Ancient Greeks?QCA Unit 14How do we use Ancient Greek ideas today?

QCA Unit 15

What was it like to live here in the past?

QCA Unit 18

How are our toys different from those in the past?

QCA unit 1

What were seaside holidays like in the past?

QCA Unit 3

Geography

An island home – Katie Morag QCA Unit 3Around our school – the local area QCA Unit 1 (compare to island home )Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 How can we make the local area safer? QCA Unit 2How can we improve the area we see from the window? QCA Unit 21Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24 Going to the seaside/compare localities QCA Unit 4Ongoing Geography skills QCA Units 5/18/24

PE

Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Unit 19/20/30Athletics QCA Unit 1/17/18 Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Unit 19/20/30Athletics QCA Unit 1/17/18 Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Unit 19/20/30Athletics QCA Unit 1/17/18 Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Unit 19/20/30Athletics QCA Unit 1/17/18 Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Unit 19/20/30Athletics QCA Unit 1/17/18

Art

Mother Nature QCA Unit 2B Take a seat QCA Unit 4B Investigating materials QCA Unit 1B What is sculpture? QCA Unit 1C Landscapes – seaside

Music

Painting with sound – Exploring sound colours QCA Unit 13QCA Units 1/8/ 15 – Ongoing skillsEnglish Folk music & Worship music Singing Games QCAUnit 14QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsTudor music & Worship music

 

Taking off – Exploring pitch QCA Unit 5QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsAncient Greek music & Worship music The long and short of it – Exploring duration QCA Unit 3QCA Units 1/8/15 – Ongoing skillsPopular music & Worship music Sounds interesting  – exploring sounds QCA unit 2Seaside music & Worship music

RE

How do beliefs of Christians influence actions?  QCA Unit 5DCelebrations – Pentecost ParablesCelebrations  -Pentecost Places of worship – Christian churches QCA Units 1F/2D Religions in our neighbourhood – QCA Unit 4D Stories of Jesus QCA Unit 2B

Citizenship

Animals and us QCA Unit 3Moving on (QCA Unit 12) when relevant Rules and Laws QCA Unit 8 (include politics)Moving on (QCA Unit 12) when relevant Multicultural educationMoving on (QCA Unit 12) when relevant Developing our school grounds QCA Unit 6Moving on (QCA Unit 12) when relevant Children’s rights, human rights (include Amnesty International)QCA Unit 7Moving on (QCA Unit 12) when relevant

MFL

French/Spanish – Basic vocabulary and QCA at relevant levels

 

Phase 2 – 4 Year Rolling Programme

 

Year A

Autumn

Year A

Spring

Year A

Summer

 

Life in Medieval Times

France

British Empire

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work andLight and Sound QCA Unit 8K, 8LHow we see things QCA Unit 6F

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

Practical science linked to PACE work andEnergy resources and energy transfer QCA Unit 7ICells and cell functions  QCA Unit 7A

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

Practical Science linked to PACE work andClassifying materials QCA Unit 7G, 8E, 8I, 9HMaterials QCA Unit 6C

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

DT

Understanding materials: Textiles QCA Unit 7aiiiDesigning and Making: Textiles QCA Unit 7biiiUsing ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

Tie dye Shopping bags/Footwear (Based on QCA Unit 6B)

 

Exploring materials: Textiles QCA Unit 8aiiiDesigning for Clients: Textiles QCA Unit 8biiiProducing batches: Textiles QCA Unit 8eiii

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

Tie dye Shopping bags/Footwear (Based on QCA Unit 6B)

 

Selecting materials: Textiles QCA Unit 9aiiiDesigning for markets: Textiles QCA Unit 9biiiEnsuring quality products: Textiles QCA Unit 9eiii

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

Tie dye Shopping bags/Footwear (Based on QCA Unit 6B)

ICT

Data analysis QCA Unit 5Using sensors and measuring data QCA Unit 7Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Presentation QCA Unit 6AUsing ICT multimedia presentation QCA Unit 1Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Collating data to develop information services QCA Unit 8Project QCA Unit 12/16Ongoing development of skills cross curricular

History

Life in Medieval Times QCA Unit 3Medieval Monarchs/Churches QCA Units 2 &4 French Revolution QCA Unit 10Industrial Changes QCA Unit 11 Mughal India and the coming of the British QCA Unit 13British Empire QCA Unit 14

Geography

European Weather Patterns QCA Unit 10World Sport QCA Unit 6 

Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing

 The changing economic geography of France QCA Unit 17Images of a country QCA Unit 12Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Shopping  QCA Unit 9Tourism QCA Unit 19Fashion Industry QCA Unit 18

Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing

PE

 

Dance QCA Units 1/2/3/4Invasion games QCA Units 6/7/8 Gymnastics QCA Units 15/16/17/18Net/Wall Games QCA Units 12/13/14 Athletics QCA Units 22/23/24Games QCA Units 5/6

Art

People in action QCA Unit 6A  What’s in a building? QCA Unit 7B Change your style – fashion QCA Unit 9B

Music

Form and Structure QCA Unit 2 Medieval musicChristmas rehearsal

Worship music

Variations QCA Unit 7 Who knows? Exploring musical processQCA Unit 21(KS2)

Music from other cultures and Worship music

 

Concerto QCA Unit 14Classical Music and Worship music

RE

Where do we look for God QCA Unit 7AWhat does Jesus’ incarnation mean for Christians today? QCA Unit 8AHarvest festival/Christmas Religious Figures QCA Unit 7CWho was Gotama Buddha? QCA Unit 7DEaster Where are we going – rites of passageBased on QCA Unit 9APentecost

Citizenship

Leisure and sport in the local community QCA Unit 8Human rights QCA Unit 3  Britain: a diverse society QCA Unit 4 Significance of media in society QCA Unit 9Local democracy QCA Unit 7

MFL

Spanish/French – Follow Rosetta Stone Programme and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year B

Autumn

Year B

Spring

 

Year B

Summer

 

Exploration

Oppression and rights

Impact of Science

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work andElectricity and Magnetism QCA Unit 8J, 9IPatterns of behaviour – metals QCA Unit 9E, 9F

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

Practical science linked to PACE work andChanging materials – chemical QCA Unit 9GOngoing Scientific enquiry Practical Science linked to PACE work andHumans as organisms QCA Unit 7B, 8B, 8C,The Earth and Beyond QCA Unit 7L, 9J

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

DT

Understanding materials: Food QCA Unit 7aiDesigning and Making: Food QCA Unit 7biUsing ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

 

Exploring materials: Food QCA Unit 8aiDesigning for Clients: Food QCA Unit 8biProducing batches: Food QCA Unit 8ei

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

 

Selecting materials: Food QCA Unit 9aiDesigning for markets: Food QCA Unit 9biEnsuring quality products: Food QCA Unit 9ei

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

 

ICT

Spreadsheets QCA Unit 4Data Protection QCA Unit 11Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Control Devices QCA Unit 6Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Control systems QCA Unit 13Ongoing development of skills cross curricular

History

Elizabeth I QCA Unit 5

Tudors & exploration

QCA Unit 19(KS2)

 

Women’s vote QCA Unit 16Black American Slavery QCA Unit 15 20th Century Medicine QCA Unit 20Scientific discoveries that changed the world QCA Unit 21

Geography

Map work linked to Tudor explorationPassport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Investigating Columbia QCA Unit 11Local Action – Global Effects QCA Unit 23Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Floods QCA Unit 4Rivers QCA Unit 7Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing

PE

 

Striking/Fielding Games QCA Units 9/10/11Gymnastics  QCA Units 15/16/17/18 Swimming QCA Units 19/20/21 Outdoor and Adventurous  QCA Units 25/26/27Athletics  QCA Units 22/23/24 

Art

What a performance QCA Unit 6B Life events QCA Unit 9A  Animating Art QCA Unit 8B

Music

Musical clichés QCA Unit 5Shanty time QCA Unit 6Christmas rehearsal

Worship music

Songwriter – Lyrics and Melody QCA Unit 19(KS2)Songs written by singerWorship music

 

The overture QCA Unit 11Hooks and riffs QCA Unit 10Country Music

Worship Music

RE

What does justice mean to Christians QCA Unit 7BHarvest festival/Christmas  What does Jesus resurrection mean for Christians today? QCA Unit 8BEaster Where did the universe come from?Based on QCA Unit 9BPentecost

Citizenship

Crime QCA Unit 2Debating a global issue QCA Unit 10 Why did some men and women struggle for the vote? QCA Unit 12School Linking QCA Unit 17 Government, election and voting QCA Unit 6What’s in the public interest QCA Unit 20 

MFL

Spanish/French – Follow Rosetta Stone Programme and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year C

Autumn

Year C

Spring

Year C

Summer

 

Civil War

World War

Volcanoes

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work andChanging materials – physical/geological QCA Unit 8G, 8H, 9GPatterns of behaviour – acids and bases QCA Unit 7E, 7F, 9F

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

Practical science linked to PACE work andLiving things in their environment QCA Unit 7C, 8DInterdependence and Adaptation QCA Unit 6A

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

 

Practical Science linked to PACE work andForces and Motion QCA Unit 7K, 9LMicro-organisms  QCA Unit 6B

Ongoing Scientific enquiry

DT

Understanding materials: Resistant Materials QCA Unit 7aiiDesigning and Making: Resistant Materials QCA Unit 7biiUsing ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing Exploring materials: Resistant materials QCA Unit 8aiiDesigning for Clients: Resistant materials QCA Unit 8biiProducing batches: Resistant materials QCA Unit 8eii

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

Selecting materials: Resistant materials QCA Unit 9aiiDesigning for markets: Resistant materials QCA Unit 9biiEnsuring quality products: Resistant materials QCA Unit 9eii

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoing

ICT

Using the internet QCA Unit 6DWeb page QCA Unit 9Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Processing texts and images QCA Unit 3Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Global Communication QCA Unit 14Ongoing development of skills cross curricular

History

Civil War QCA Unit 8Britain 1500-1750 QCA Unit 7 Impacts of 20th century wars QCA Unit 18Holocaust – Anne Frank QCA Unit 19 19th century middle class life QCA Unit 12 

Geography

Exploring England QCA Unit 5People QCA Unit 3Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Eco-systems and consequences QCA Unit 14Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Earthquakes and Volcanoes QCA Unit 2Virtual Volcanoes and Internet earthquakes QCA Unit 21Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing

PE

 

Games  QCA Units 5/6Outdoor and Adventurous QCA Units 25/26/27 Dance  QCA Units 1/2/3/4Striking/Fielding games  QCA Units 9/10/11 Athletics  QCA Units 22/23/24Net/Wall Games  QCA Units 12/13/14

Art

Landscapes QCA Unit 7C Shared View QCA Unit 8C Personal Places, public spaces QCA Unit 9C

Music

Musical cycles QCA Unit 4Christmas rehearsalWorship music Music for dance QCA Unit 9Song QCA Unit 15Dance Music

Worship music

Bhajan/Gawwali (Indian) QCA Unit 12Jazz QCA Unit 8Jazz/Blues Music

Worship Music

RE

A visit to a place of worship QCA Unit 8EOur church –Place of worship QCA Unit 6E 

Harvest festival/Christmas

Beliefs and practices QCA Unit 8CEaster Why do we suffer? Based on QCA Unit 9CPentecost

Citizenship

People and the environment QCA Unit 21 Why is it so difficult to keep the peace in the world today? QCA Unit 11How do we deal with conflict? QCA Unit 13 Developing skills of democratic participation QCA Unit 14Developing the school grounds QCA Unit 18

MFL

Spanish/French – Follow Rosetta Stone Programme and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year D

Autumn

Year D

Spring

Year D

Summer

 

Settlers

Economic Development

Contrasting Environments

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see pace and sequence sheet

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work andMaterials QCA Units 6DClassifying materials QCA unit 7H,8F,

Forces and Motion QCA Unit 6G 9K,

Practical science linked to PACE work andElectricity, QCA Unit  6E, 7J,Organisms QCA Units 8A 9B Practical science linked to PACE work andGreen plants as organisms QCA Unit 9C, 9DVariation, classification and inheritance QCA Unit 7D, 9A

DT

Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoingElectrical and Mechanical Structures QCA Unit 7dFairground/Controllable vehicle (Based on QCA Units 6C/D) (Mechanical components) Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoingUsing control for security QCA Unit 8dFairground/Controllable vehicle (Based on QCA Units 6C/D) (Mechanical components) Using ICT QCA Units 7c/8c/9c – ongoingControl for Electrical monitoring QCA Unit 9dFairground/Controllable vehicle (Based on QCA Units 6C/D) (Mechanical components)

ICT

Information and Presentation QCA Unit 2

Spreadsheet modelling QCA Unit 6B

Ongoing development of skills cross curricular

Information: reliability/bias QCA Unit 10Ongoing development of skills cross curricular Software programming – Raspberry PiOngoing development of skills cross curricular

History

Why have people invaded and settled here in the past?  A Roman study  QCA Unit 6AWhy have people invaded and settled here in the past?  An Anglo Saxon  study – QCA Unit 6CBWhy have people invaded and settled here in the past?  A Viking study – QCA Unit 6C Islamic states QCA Unit 6 General historical skills

Geography

Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Economic Development QCA Unit 16Crime QCA Unit 15Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing Contrasting EnvironmentsInvestigating coastsQCA Units  13, 22 and 23 (KS2)

Coastal Environments QCA Unit 8

Limestone Landscapes of England QCA Unit 13

Passport to the world QCA Unit 24 – ongoing

PE

 

Invasion Games  QCA Units 6/7/8Dance  QCA Units 1/2/3/4 Gymnastics  QCA Units 15/16/17/18Net/Wall Games  QCA Units 12/13/14 Athletics  QCA Units 22/23/24Striking and Fielding  QCA Units 9/10/11

Art

Objects and Viewpoints QCA Unit 8A Self image as a start point QCA Unit 7A Landscapes QCA Unit 6C

Music

Stars hide your faces – Performing together QCA Unit 20 (KS2)Christmas rehearsalWorship music Music and Media QCA Unit 13Popular MusicWorship Music Soundscapes QCA Unit 3Instrumental MusicWorship Music

RE

Christian Worship – QCA Unit 6AReligious buildings/places of worship QCA Unit 6BHarvest festival/Christmas

 

Beliefs and practices: how do beliefs of Sikhs affect actions? QCA Unit 8DWhat makes a gurdwara special to Sikhs QCA Unit 8FEaster What are we doing to the environment? QCA Unit 7EPentecost 

 

Citizenship

How the law protects animals QCA Unit 5 Crime and Safety awareness QCA Unit 15 Celebrating human rights QCA Unit 16

MFL

Spanish/French – Follow Rosetta Stone Programme and QCA at relevant levels

 

Phase 3 – 1 Year programme – repeated

Year A

Autumn

Year A

Spring

Year A

Summer

English

Creative Writing, Drama, Speaking, Listening and opportunities to read a range of texts linked to topic work/PACE work – see Pace and Sequence sheet

 

Maths

Practical Maths linked to PACE work and topic work – see Pace and Sequence sheet

 

 

Science

Practical science linked to PACE work – see Pace and Sequence sheet

 

 

ICT

Ongoing development of skills

 

Ongoing development of skillsOngoing development of skills

PE

 

Striking/Fielding Games QCA Units 9/10/11

 

Invasion games QCA Units 6/7/8Dance QCA Units 1/2/3/4

Net/Wall Games QCA Units 12/13/14Athletics QCA Units 22/23/24

Outdoor and Adventurous  QCA Units 25/26/27

Citizenship

Unit 1 – Human rights

 

Unit 2- Crime

Unit 3 – Challenging racism and discriminationUnit 4 – How and why are laws made?

Unit 5 – How the economy functions

Unit 6 – Business and Enterprise

Career GuidanceUnit 10 – Rights and responsibilities in the world of work

Work experience

Career guidance

MFL

Spanish/French – Follow Rosetta Stone Programme and QCA at relevant levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1

Provision and Expectations for Phases

Phase 1 Learning Centre

Provision

The Phase 1 Learning centre and classroom should:

-          Be Stimulating

-          Be Creative

-          Be Interactive

-          Have a Variety of activities – independent and adult led

-          Facilitate the A.C.E curriculum for Years R-5

-          Teach a supplementary curriculum broadly in line with National Curriculum

-          Meet all the criteria for the EYFS – All areas of learning should be evident

-          Use the inside and outside area effectively as continuous provision

-          Be a purposeful, calm and positive learning environment

Planning/Preparation

A.C.E curriculum Extended Curriculum and EYFS
-          ABCs with Ace and Christi Learning to Read program

 

-          PACEs – run the Learning centre

 

-          Oral/Book reports for privilege (monthly)

 

-          EYFS overview of provision – termly plan (key permanent provision and a rotation of other equipment)

-          Response to Stimulus – include activities linked to topic, areas of EYFS, world news/festivals etc. – overview plan termly

-          Plan based on the needs of the children – at the end of each term of Reception year/Year 1 – one plan as an overview

-          EYFS – Adult Initiated experiences and child led opportunities– incl. activities taken from Response to Stimulus Plan –  weekly plan

-          Literacy and Numeracy input – input daily (to include ABCs for Rec)– weekly plan for Rec/Yr 1 (and other year groups as appropriate)

-          Follow 5 year Long Term Plan for extended curriculum – generally taught in the afternoons

-          Include in timetable weekly: Circle time/Life skills/Community challenge/Story time/Times table or counting challenge

-          Follow a plan for activities before morning registration

-          Hear children read at least twice a week (teacher to oversee)

-          Include cross curricular use of ICT in planning regularly (can use laptop – supervised in Creative Play)

-          Ensure Creative Play is set up after the weekend

-          Set up daily activities and daily provision, including the use of the outside area

-          Have a topic book for Supplementary curriculum work

-          Children to have Individual Writing targets stuck in their topic books

-          All pupils to also have an Insight notebook, Merit Bank card,

 

 

 

End of Year Expectations

Age PACEs PACE procedures Extended Curriculum
Reception Follow ABCs programme

1 phonic sound a week

Complete up to 1012 in Animal Science, Word Building and Bible PACEs

Complete up to at least 1003 in Maths

Learn to read ‘sight’ words

Large goal cardCross off own goals with a ruler

Have a neat office

Work neatly

Begin to learn to use 1 flag

Goals set by Supervisor following ABCs

Adult to score

Adult to fill in privilege slipFollow EYFS objectives and compile an EYFS Profile for each child as evidence to assess against those

Learn to read and spell 50 Reception HFW

Blend CVC words

Reading book  – ‘I can read’ stage complete

Counting challenge – have achieved some of the targets

Mental MathsYear 1At least 4 pages per day

Complete up to at least  1006 in English, Maths, Science and Social Studies

Complete extension lessons of ABCs

Maintain academic balance

Large goal cardCross off own goals with a ruler

Have a neat office

Work neatly

Begin to set own goals

Not sit waiting when flag is up

Use 1 flag correctly

Complete 4 pages per day

Write own privilege slip with support

Score work independently

Rescore work with supportFollow National Curriculum levels for assessment (see Assessment policy)

Read and spell HFW and phonic blends

Achieve Literacy and Numeracy targets taken from Writing/Maths levels and APP

Reading book – up to Stage 4

Counting challenge

Mental MathsYear 2At least 5 pages per day

Complete up to at least 1012 in English, Maths, Science and Social Studies

Maintain academic balance

Large goal cardCross off own goals with a ruler

Have a neat office

Work neatly

Not sit waiting when flag is up

Set own goals

Use 2 flags correctly

Complete 5 pages per day

Score and rescore work independently

Complete own privilege slipFollow National Curriculum levels for assessment (see Assessment policy)

Read and spell HFW and phonic blends

Achieve Literacy and Numeracy targets taken from Writing/Maths levels and APP

Counting challenge – complete and begin times table challenge x1,2,5,10

Reading book – up to stage 6
Mental MathsYears 3, 4 and 5As outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual

Maintain academic balance

Large goal cardAs outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual – follow all procedures correctly

Follow National Curriculum levels for assessment (see Assessment policy)

Read and spell HFW and phonic blends

Times table challenge –

Yr 3 = x1,2,3,4,5,9,10,

Yr 4 = x6,7,8

Yr 5 = x 11 ,12

Reading book

Yr 3 = within stage 9

Yr 4 = within Stage 12

Yr 5 = within Stage 15

Mental Maths skills

Also see Pace and Sequence sheet and separate programme of activities – PSHE/circle time/applying for privilege/mental maths/word or sentence work/independent reading etc.

 

Delivery

-          Have at least 1 teacher and 1 support assistant (where possible)

-          Adult support is to be directed effectively and strategically

-          Children should have appropriate amount of time in offices and playing – could also use clocks if playing independently at other times

-          Play should be both independent and adult led

-          All staff should be engaged with the children at all times either at work or play (playing games with children, doing an adult led task, helping a child in their office, carrying out the ABCs/Lit/Num sessions), working one-to-one with a child for extra support, hearing a child read/flashcards etc.

-          Ensure and encourage PACE procedures to be carried out correctly – correct use of flags/neat goal cards/set own goals (year 1) /correct scoring and re-scoring/neat PACE work/share targets/keep jigsaws up to date/tidy offices etc.

-          Vary ways of delivering ABCs – ensure the Physical Development and Creative tasks are included

-          Teacher is responsible for all teaching and learning

-          Encourage adult led activities to be continued during free play/break times by setting challenges, leaving out activities for the children to play with following input etc.

Standards and Assessment

-          Collect Evidence for EYFS profile

-          Complete Goal Check report daily

-          Keep records up to date (SPC – set annual goals and check regularly)

-          Ensure Academic Balance and on track with PACEs

-          Follow Assessment policy for assessment of Supplementary Curriculum

-          Ensure PACEs are marked daily and Congratulations slips given the following morning

 

Monitoring

-          Hand in Infant Learning Centre file when Planning file is handed in

-          Observations of Learning Centre and Supplementary curriculum

-          Spot checks of PACEs

-          EYFS profile data

 

 

Suggested Timetable

Phase 1 Learning Centre timetable – mornings

Rec Yr 1/2 Yr 3/4
9.25-9.45am (20 mins) ABCs PACE work PACE work
9.45 – 10am (15 mins) PACE work Literacy input PACE work (or Literacy input)
10-10.10am FRUIT BREAK FRUIT BREAK FRUIT BREAK
10.10-10.25am (15 mins) Numeracy input/Practical Maths Numeracy input/Practical Maths Numeracy input/Practical Maths
10.25 – 10.45am (20 mins) PACE work PACE work PACE work
10.45-11am (15 mins) Adult led activity PACE work/Free play PACE work
11-11.15am (up to 11.30am depending on privilege) BREAKTIME/PACE work BREAKTIME/PACE work BREAKTIME/PACE work
11.30-12pm PACE work/Physical Activity/Creative Activity/Adult led activity/Free Play

PACE work/ Free Play/Set goals for next day

PACE work/ Free Play/Set goals for next day

 

12pm – Separate programme of activities – story time/circle time/applying for privilege/times tables-counting-mental maths

 

Classroom Management

-          The EYFS and Creative Play can also be used to good effect in the afternoons

-          Ensure a variety of stimulus in the afternoons – use different rooms, Yr 3 and 4 use Creative Play, use support staff creatively

-          Can any activities be done in the mornings as part of Response to Stimulus/input/adult led activity?

-          Follow relevant policies

 

 

 

 

 

Phase 2 and 3 Learning Centres

Provision

The Phase 2 and 3 Learning centre and classroom should:

-          Be Stimulating

-          Be Creative

-          Be Interactive

-          Facilitate the A.C.E curriculum for Years 6-13

-          Teach a supplementary curriculum broadly in line with National Curriculum

-          Be a purposeful, calm and positive learning environment

Planning & Preparation

A.C.E curriculum Extended Curriculum

-          PACEs

 

-          Follow Phase 2 –  4 year Long Term Plan for extended curriculum – generally taught in the afternoons or Phase 1 yearly programme

-          Include PSHE/Circle time/Life skills/Community challenge/Reading time/times tables and mental maths practice

-          Follow a plan of activities before morning registration

-          Hear children read at least once a week until they are a Free Reader

-          Peer read with Phase 1

-          Give them opportunity to lead a lunchtime club for 6 weeks with adult supervision

 

End of Year Expectations

Age PACEs PACE procedures Extended Curriculum
Years 6-9 As outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual

Maintain academic balance

Small goal card

As outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual – follow all procedures correctlyFollow National Curriculum levels for assessment (see Assessment policy)

Yr 6 = Reading book – Free Reader

Times table challenge – speed and extension past x12 and division facts

Include PSHE/Circle time/Life skills/Community challengeYears 10-13As outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual including electives

Maintain academic balance

Small goal card

As outlined in the ICCE manual and ACE procedures manual – follow all procedures correctlyTop up ICCE qualifications and options with PE, PSHE/Citizenship, MfL, Careers Guidance

Include Circle time/Life skills/Community challenge

Take part in Student Convention

 

Delivery

-          Have at least 1 member of staff teaching ( 2 members of staff for more practical activities if required) or running learning centre

-          Adult support is to be directed effectively and strategically

-          Children should have appropriate amount of time in offices

-          Plan a timetable according to individuals within learning centre and options taken

-          Include PE, PSHE/Citizenship, Devotions and MfL

-          Ensure and encourage PACE procedures to be carried out correctly

 

Standards and Assessment

-          Complete Goal Check report daily

-          Keep records up to date (SPC – set annual goals and check regularly)

-          Ensure Academic Balance and on track with PACEs

-          Follow Assessment policy for assessment of Supplementary Curriculum

-          Ensure PACEs are marked daily and Congratulations slips given the following morning

-          Follow ICCE manual for external moderation guidance for ICCE work

 

Monitoring

-          Hand in Planning file

-          Observations of Learning Centre and Supplementary curriculum

-          Spot checks of PACEs

-          ICCE moderation by CEE

 

Suggested Timetable

9.25-10am PACE work
10-10.10am FRUIT BREAK
10.10-11am PACE work
11-11.15am (11.30am depending on privilege) BREAKTIME (or PACE work)
11.30am-12.20pm PACE work

Also see Pace and Sequence sheet and separate programme of activities – PSHE/circle time/applying for privilege/mental maths/word or sentence work/independent reading etc.

 

Classroom Management

-          Follow relevant policies

 

 

Appendix 2

 

Subject coverage

New Life Christian Academy

Curriculum Subject Coverage

Subjects in

Educational Standards advice

Accelerated Christian Education

Core Curriculum

Expanded Curriculum

Where ACE covers these areas in the PACEs, selected elements from QCA will be taken to enhance and broaden learning

Linguistic (including Foreign Language) English

Literature and Creative Writing

Word Building and EtymologyMfL – QCA/Rosetta Stone

Reading opportunities

Creative WritingMathematicalMaths

Additional practical maths and problem

solving activities linked to PACEs and APP assessment

Times table/counting challengeScientificScience

Practical Science linked to PACE work &

QCATechnological (including ICT)

D & T –  QCA

ICT –  QCAHuman and SocialSocial Studies – including  History + Geography

History – QCA

Geography – QCAPhysical

Outdoor provision

PE – QCAAesthetic and Creative

Art – QCA

Music – QCA

Dance – QCA

Creative Literacy – Writing, Drama, Speaking and ListeningSpiritual, Moral, Social and CulturalBible Reading

RE – QCA

Citizenship – QCA

PSHE – Circle time/Assemblies/Ongoing/Health for Life

Multi-cultural Education – ongoing

 

Additional events in school: Life skills/Community challenge/Harvest festival/ Comic relief/Children in Need/Columbia Childcare Christmas Fair/Links with local primary school/New Life Creative Arts show/Christmas production/Extra-curricular clubs/Advent_ure art project/Student convention

 

Appendix 3

 

Additional Information

New Life Christian Academy

 

Supplementary Reading Opportunities

 

Reading books

  • Children will all have a reading book from the Oxford Reading Tree scheme (unless the child is not ready to begin on this).
  • It is expected that these books will be taken home and read to parents at least once or twice a week.  Parents are to comment in the children’s Reading Diary when they have heard their child read.
  • Children will be heard read in school at least once a week and comments written on the reading record sheet for that child. It is expected that younger children (in the Infant Learning Centre) will be heard at least 3 times a week to reinforce and develop their reading and comprehension skills.
  • When a book is finished the child is to put it on the desk in the classroom to alert an adult that this needs changing.
  • Staff are to make sure that books are being changed regularly and will chase up any child who does not have their book in school or not reading at home.
  • Any lost books must be reported to the Headteacher.
  • When a teacher deems a child is ready they may move up to the next stage in the reading scheme.
  • When a child has completed Stage 16 they are then eligible to become a ‘free reader’ and may then choose any book in the library as their reading book.  They should still be encouraged to read at home and be heard in school.

Reading for pleasure

  • Children will have opportunities during the school week to reading independently and for pleasure.   During this time they may read any book of their choosing and be encouraged to share their enjoyment of the book with others.
  • Book reports can also be done during this time in order to work towards achieving privilege.

Listening to stories being told

  • Children will also have opportunities during the week to hear stories being read aloud.  This may be an adult reading to them, another child reading out loud or they may listen to a tape or CD in the Creative Learning Area.

 

Library and Book Corner

  • The school has provided children with a library containing a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction texts as well as audio stories and a more structured reading scheme.
  • The Library (located in The Boardroom) and Book Corner (located in the Creative Learning Area/Infant Learning Centre) is available for the children to use during early morning work, at lunchtimes, during any indoor play times and, for the Infants, as part of their ABCs and morning ACE programme.

 

Times tables

Bronze

Counting

Silver

Recite

Gold

Random

Champion

÷ facts

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Times table Achievements

Child________________________________________

  • Pupils are given an assessment as they come into the school which is recorded on the sheet (with the date) and used as a base line.
  • Younger/less able children start with Counting (see separate sheet)
  • They then work towards further certificates by learning the appropriate times tables.
  • They must do them in order, Bronze, Silver then Gold.  Only when they have done all Gold can they move onto division.
  • More able pupils may move onto x13 etc.
  • Less able pupils need to concentrate on Bronze and Silver.
  • Copies of all times tables are in the cloakroom so that children can request photocopies to take home.
  • Tests can be done at fruit break, playtimes or lunchtimes.
  • When achieved the date will be added to the chart and a certificate awarded in the following days assembly.
  • Pupil’s individual record sheets are in their offices and pupils are to be made aware of their targets (which to focus on).
  • Time will be given each week to mental maths which may include times tables.
  • Pupils are encouraged to test each other and take them home for parents to help with also.

 

I can…

Date achieved

Count in 1s to 10

Count to 10 and back

Count in 2s to 20

Count in 5s to 50

Count in 10s to 100

Count in odd numbers to 11

Count in 1s to 30

 

Count in 1s to 100

 

 

Counting Superstar

Child________________________________________

Cross Curricular Learning

 

 

Ethos and Aims
The curriculum offers exciting opportunities for developing children’s subject specific skills and knowledge and also important opportunities for helping children recognise the links between curriculum subjects. Emphasising links between subjects help children make sense of what they are learning. Cross curricular links are crucial to learning as learning depends on being able to make connections between prior knowledge and experiences and new information and experiences. Such connections help us make sense of our world and develop our capacity to learn. The human brain increases capacity by making connections (synapses) not merely by amassing information.
Making links between subjects also helps us learn more effectively as it offers opportunities to apply and embedded skills and knowledge in meaningful and purposeful contexts. Strong links can enhance learning in all subjects. They help learners see the relevance, within a wider context, of the skills and knowledge they are acquiring in specific subjects.
Making cross curricular links can help learners recognise how they are learning. There are certain aspects of learning – such as problem solving, reasoning, creative thinking – that are used across the whole curriculum. During cross curricular work teachers can help learners recognise these underpinning skills and how they are used in different contexts. Recognition is an important step towards then reflecting on and using such skills in a strategic, flexible and intentional way.
Individuals in the 21st century will need to be creative, adaptable, life-long learners to take full advantage of changing social and employment situations. Cross curricular learning is an important element in developing such individuals. Cross curricular learning helps develop learners who are able to adapt their learning to new situations. The essence of creativity is in making new connections and cross curricular learning encourages this process.

As well as enhanced learning, cross curricular links can add further interest and enjoyment to the curriculum by enabling teachers and children to access the curriculum in innovative ways. Schools can combine or adapt existing schemes of work or rearrange the school’s curriculum map to take advantage of strong links between subjects or identify linking themes. Increasing interest and enjoyment enhances motivation which in turn promotes achievement. The case studies in Excellence and Enjoyment Key aspects of learning across the primary curriculum give many examples of exciting and challenging cross curricular learning experiences such as science linked with a study of ancient Egypt and museum visit, geography and a local area study linked with an outdoors education unit or PHSE linked with art and design.
Developing links between subjects enables schools to offer a broad and rich curriculum. The Ofsted report ‘ The curriculum in successful Primary Schools’ found that many of these schools ‘made good use of links across subjects which:
• strengthened the relevance and coherence of the curriculum for pupils
• ensured that pupils applied the knowledge and skills learned in one subject to others, thus reinforcing their learning and increasing their understanding and confidence
• made good use of longer blocks of time, enabling pupils to undertake sustained work on themes covering two or three subjects.
Curriculum and Delivery
At New Life Christian Academy our curriculum allows both a subject specific approach and also a cross curricular experience. Our ACE programme (generally done in the mornings) will teach children core skills in Maths, Science, English (Language and Literature), Social Studies (History/Geography) and Biblical Studies enabling a development of key skills and knowledge in that specific subject area. In addition our supplementary curriculum will be delivered in this cross curricular approach. The cross-curricular approach enables the teacher to provide a vehicle through which children can apply the skills and concepts gained from the core subject teaching. Furthermore, the children become aware of how to use, develop and extend the many skills they are gaining, they see a purpose and value in having those skills, and the topic usually produces an end result whereas subject teaching tends to be on-going. To reinforce the understanding that skills and knowledge gained through subject teaching are the “tools” people use to solve problems, make discoveries, communicate with others etc., the children will be made aware of which type of skills they are using when undertaking topic work, i.e. mathematical, scientific, etc

Evidence of cross curricular learning will be seen throughout our supplementary curriculum.
For example data handling skills learnt in maths purposely applied in geography and science; experiencing and describing processes in geography and science offer children relevant experiences and enhanced understanding when learning how to write explanations in English; learning about rhythm and pattern in music can enhance children’s creation of rhythmical and patterned sequences of movement in PE. Teachers will use any opportunities to bring in cross curricular learning when appropriate eg creating line graphs from pulse rates to show changes before, during and after exercise in PE, measuring in DT and Art, historical map work etc. In addition ICT will be evident across all subject areas, as it is used appropriately and in a variety of ways: as a research tool, to present information in a variety of ways, to communicate with others, to collect and store information, to edit and improve text and in any other way that enabled effective learning. Literacy will also be employed in other areas of the curriculum and pupils will write regularly in a genre or style linked to other subjects eg a biography of an artist, an explanation of how/why something works (science), a set of instructions (DT), an information text (history/geography), persuasive text about our rights (PSHE/citizenship) and so on. Talk strategies will also be used across every curriculum area and drama will also feature in a range of lessons.

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development
New Life Christian Academy will also embed Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural development and understanding across every area of school life. As a Christian school pupils will experience Spiritual input throughout the school day, from assembly to prayers at lunchtimes, to more formal discussions/devotions alongside the RE curriculum. Moral principles will be taught as part of citizenship and also through the biblical character traits that run through the ACE programme such as being Honest, Responsible, Virtuous and Self controlled. The ethnic diversity of the school and it’s links to the wider community will allow a broad social and cultural experience for all pupils. They will be encouraged to share their own cultures and experiences with each other and also learn about other cultures, promoting tolerance and harmony, to allow them to develop a greater understanding and relationship with both other pupils and the wider community. This will allow pupils to accept and value each other as God accepts and values them as individuals. It will also enable pupils to develop and maintain a balanced outlook and lifestyle, socially, morally and spiritually, as they grow up to enable them to act responsibly and know the value and importance of making a difference in the lives of other people. Staff will act as role models for pupils in all these areas and challenge any discrimination (in accordance with Equality Act 2010). Our curriculum will also include Life skills including sewing, manners, safety, hygiene, cooking etc as well as skills such as tying shoe laces, making the bed, setting the table, first aid, map skills, sign language etc. so that children will be given the opportunity to practise and develop these skills. Pupils will also be taught about local and national government as well as the justice system. This will also include fundamental British values (democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect, and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs), respecting the civil and criminal law and presenting political issues in a balanced way (precluding promotion of partisan views) through lessons, assemblies and PACE work. All of this combining to give pupils the best opportunity to become effective independent adults who can make their own informed decisions.

 

Sex and Relationships Education Policy

We have based our school’s sex education policy within the context of a Christian school on the Dfe guidance document Sex and Relationship Education Guidance (ref Dfe0116/2000). In this document, sex education is defined as ‘learning about physical, moral and emotional development. It is about understanding the importance of marriage for family life, stable and

loving relationships, respect, love and care. It is also about the teaching of sex, reproduction, gender differences and sexual health. Sex education is part of the personal, social and health education curriculum in our school. While we use sex education to inform children about sexual issues, we do this with regard to matters of morality and individual responsibility, and in a way that allows children to ask and explore moral questions. We do not use sex education as a means of promoting any sexual activity or any form of sexual orientation.

We teach sex education in the context of the school’s aims and values framework.  While sex education in our school means that we give children information about sexual behaviour, we do this with an awareness of the moral code and values which underpin all our work in school. In particular, we teach sex education in the belief that: sex education should be taught in the context of marriage and family life; sex education is part of a wider social, personal, spiritual and moral education process; children should be taught to have respect for their own bodies; children should learn about their responsibilities to others, and be aware of the consequences of sexual activity; it is important to build positive relationships with others, involving trust and respect; children need to learn the importance of self-control

It has three main elements:

1. attitudes and values

 learning the importance of values and individual conscience and moral considerations

 learning the value of family life, marriage and stable and loving relationships for the nurture of

children

 learning the value of respect, love and care

 exploring, considering and understanding moral dilemmas

 developing critical thinking as part of decision-making

2. personal and social skills

 learning to manage emotions and relationships confidently and sensitively

 developing self-respect and empathy for others

 learning to make choices based on an understanding of difference and with an absence of

prejudice

 developing an appreciation of the consequences of choices made

 managing conflict

 learning to recognise and avoid exploitation and abuse

3. knowledge and understanding

 learning and understanding physical development at appropriate stages

 understanding human reproduction, emotions and relationships

 

The staff and Governors consider that sex education should form part of the curriculum.

We are a Christian school and we wish to present our sex education within a moral, family-oriented and Christian framework, whilst being aware of the different lifestyles and backgrounds of the children committed to our care. Children today are made aware of sexual situations and words

at a very early age through the media, peers, etc. They need to be given correct information at the appropriate school level with particular care and sensitivity, matching teaching to the maturity of the pupils involved and promoting healthy growth through to adulthood. Pupils need help to cope with the physical and emotional challenges of growing up and to give them an elementary

understanding of human reproduction in the context of a loving and stable relationship, and to help them make informed choices. Cooperation between school, home and church, and with other faith communities should be encouraged

It is the policy of the school that;

  • The primary responsibility for sex education rests with the parents and is best taught within the context of the family
  • When sex is spoken about it should be with reverence and purity
  • When issues of confidentiality arise parents and students must understand that these will be referred back to the home
  • The school will seek to involve pastoral ministries of the church where necessary but only with the consent of the parents
  • Apart from the biological aspects of sex education detailed in the national curriculum, sex education does not form part of the curriculum at KS1 and 2
  • At KS1 and 2 issues to do with relationships are taught through the PSHE curriculum
  • At KS3 and 4 the biological aspects of sex education are taught through Science lessons as detailed in the national curriculum
  • Sex education at KS 3 and 4 may be taught as part of the PSHE programme or maybe supported in the home
  • Relationships education at KS3 and 4 will be taught through the PSHE curriculum

Operational Policy

Before a series of sex and relationship education sessions are taught at KS3 and 4 parents will be invited in to spend an evening reviewing the materials to be used and discussing the methods of teaching. It might be the case that in some years the consensus will be that it is not necessary to deliver lessons at the school.

These sessions will be open to all parents and provide a forum to support what is being taught in the home through discussion and the sharing of appropriate materials.

If as a result of these meetings a parent wishes to withdraw their child from lessons then they may do so, but it is hoped that a consensus will be arrived at and the primary role of the parents in this will be supported.

 

The role of parents

The school is well aware that the primary role in children’s sex education lies with parents and carers. We wish to build a positive and supporting relationship with the parents of children at our school through mutual understanding, trust and cooperation. In promoting this objective we:

inform parents about the school’s sex education policy and practice;

answer any questions that parents may have about the sex education of their child; take seriously any issue that parents raise with teachers or governors about this policy or the arrangements for sex education in the school; encourage parents to be involved in reviewing the school policy and making modifications to it as necessary; inform parents about the best practice known with regard to sex education, so that the teaching in school supports the key messages that parents and carers give to children at home. We believe that, through this mutual exchange of knowledge and information, children will benefit from being given consistent messages about their changing body and their increasing responsibilities.

 

Parents have the right to withdraw their child from part of the sex education programme that we teach in our school. (The National Curriculum programmes of study for Science are compulsory). If a parent wishes their child to be withdrawn from sex education lessons, they should discuss this with the Headteacher, and make it clear which aspects of the programme  they do not wish their child to participate in. The school always complies with the wishes of parents in this regard.

 

The role of other members of the community

We encourage other valued members of the community to work with us to provide advice and support to the children with regard to health education. In particular, members of the Local Health Authority, such as the school nurse and other health professionals, give us valuable support with our sex education programme. Other people that we call on include local clergy,

social workers and youth workers.

Confidentiality

Teachers conduct sex education lessons in a sensitive manner and in confidence. However, if a child makes a reference to being involved, or likely to be involved in sexual activity, then the teacher will take the matter seriously and deal with it as a matter of child protection. Teachers will respond in a similar way if a child indicates that they may have been a victim of abuse. In

these circumstances the teacher will talk to the child as a matter of urgency. If the teacher has concerns, they will draw their concerns to the attention of the headteacher. The headteacher will then deal with the matter in consultation with health care professionals. (See also Child Protection Policy.)

 

The role of the Headteacher

 

It is the responsibility of the Headteacher to ensure that both staff and parents are informed about our sex education policy, and that the policy is implemented effectively. It is also the headteacher’s responsibility to ensure that members of staff are given sufficient training, so that they can teach effectively and handle any difficult issues with sensitivity.

 

The headteacher liaises with external agencies regarding the school sex education programme, and ensures that all adults who work with children on these issues are aware of the school policy, and that they work within this framework.

 

The headteacher monitors this policy on a regular basis and reports to governors, when requested, on the effectiveness of the policy.

Monitoring and review

The Governing body monitors our sex education policy and makes modification if necessary.  The Governing body gives serious consideration to any comments from parents about the sex education programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The values the school would seek to promote in relation to sexuality are expressed through the following statement:

Statement On Sexuality

We affirm that human sexuality is a joyful gift of the Creator God. Sexual intercourse is a celebration of intimacy as well as procreation, intended to be enjoyed between one man and one woman in lifelong commitment, in the context of publicly recognized marriage.

We therefore recognize that consent to sexual intercourse is limited in God’s purposes, not according to age alone, but according to married status.

We affirm that single people are called to celibacy outside marriage and that human fulfillment in the single state can be attained without finding expression in sexual intercourse,

We encourage everyone, including married partners, to exercise such self-control that their sexuality is not coercive or oppressive but an expression of gentleness and kindness,

We acknowledge that the Bible condemns as sin all our selfish failures to reflect its God-given norms. We believe, however, the same Bible demonstrates Jesus’ readiness to forgive and accept those who repent of sexual sins as well as sins of greed, exploitation or injustice.

We attest that God’s renewing power and love have enabled many to experience a transformation from their former sexual condition and find fulfillment in heterosexual marriage. Others have found, in caring Christian relationships, the opportunity to give and receive forgiveness bringing them fulfillment whilst remaining celibate. Those who are single and committed to chastity, whatever their sexual orientations, are just as welcome in the fellowship of our churches as their married brothers and sisters.

We call on Christian men and women, together with all others who are committed to the renewal of marriage and family life, to reaffirm their belief in such values as the  positive context for sexual expression in our world.

 

Biblical Background

Human sexuality

Image: God made man and woman in His own image (Genesis 1:27)

Complementarity: Human beings come in two delightfully different kinds for companionship (Genesis 2:18-23).

Marriage: God’s framework for man/woman ‘togetherness’ – physical union seals and cements lifelong covenant (Genesis 2:24; Matthew 19:4-6).

Children: The ‘one flesh’ union normally leads to children (Genesis 1:27-28)

Celibacy: marriage is to be honoured but it is not the only pattern for Christian life. Singleness is also pleasing to the Lord, and can be a preferable situation (1 Corinthians 7 ). The life of Jesus Christ Himself has sanctified the unmarried state.

Symbols: marriage, fatherhood, motherhood and family all reflect the divine nature. For example – Hosea 2, Mark 2 :19, Ephesians 5: 21-33, Revelation 21 :1-2,9 (marriage), Hosea 11 :1-3, Romans 8:15- 17, Ephesians 3:15 (fatherhood), Isaiah 49:15 (motherhood), Hebrews 2:11 – 12 (brotherhood).